The Need for Skylla's Actions in the Storyline of OdysseusThe Need for Skylla's Actions in the Storyline of Odysseus

The Need for Skylla's Actions in the Storyline of Odysseus

Skylla: Twelve Hip and legs, Six Heads, and Three Themes

When Homer wove the heroes of The Odyssey right into a story, he unquestionably left room for interpretation of their activities. The characters, almost all of whom are dynamic, colorful, and 3d, are being used by Homer to provide a fun but truthful commentary on the Old Greeks and their method of life. The actions of 1 figure, the man-eating monster known as Skylla, are especially interesting when seen in the context of the others of the history. Though her contribution to the plot can be minor, Skylla's actions are important for the reason that they will be characteristic of several themes found through the entire poem. These themes are the role of the feminine in Odysseus's struggle, the hunger (figuratively and literally) of the character types in The Odyssey, and the commentary Homer makes on the those who live lawlessly.

In The Odyssey, Homer introduces many feminine individuals; some play significant functions, some are in the backdrop. Irrespective of their importance, distinctions could be made concerning their functions in the story: that's, some help with effort to greatly help Odysseus and the various other men--Arete, Athena, Nausikaa, and Eurykleia happen to be examples--and others (whom he encounters on his voyages residence) bring about the delay or destruction of them. Skylla takes on the part of the latter, simply because do Kalypso, Kirke, and the Seirenes. Although none of the women essentially harm Odysseus, each poses a deadly danger to him on his voyage.

Odysseus's knowledge with Skylla is the most deadly and disturbing. Whereas the other ladies succeed just in enticing and delaying the crew, the face with

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