Looking Carefully at One Portion of Amlies SpectrumLooking Carefully at One Portion of Amlies Spectrum

Looking Carefully at One Portion of Amlies Spectrum

Follow the Blue Arrows: Looking Closely at

One Component of Amlies Spectrum

The colour blue is employed symbolically in the visible style of Amlie to represent happiness. Watching Amlie to assemble details on the visual style of the film lends itself to the realization that to create a paper on the overall visual design and style of the film would consider a large number of viewings and a book worth of evaluation. Knowing that, the focus of the analysis is normally on a repeated visible design motif: the timely, strategic, and meaningful keeping blue light and blue things to augment and represent the designs of the story, particularly, the theme of happiness.

The primary set colors in Amlie happen to be green reddish colored and yellow. Volumes could possibly be written about the set style, color, and decoration, and how it illustrates each characters personality, but as explained earlier the focus may be the importance of the utilization of the colour blue in the place, the props, characters clothing, and light. When compared to reds and greens blue is relatively unusual, but quickly noticeable throughout the movie. While it can be done that blue items coincidently appear at important times, and hardly ever somewhere else, knowing Jean-Pierre Jeunets reputation as an extremely visual (start to see the City of Lost Children), fastidious (this is the first film Jean-Pierre Jeunet shot on site and, as a result of lack of control, it'll be the previous), and preparatory (pictures, angles, lenses, and camera movements were decided times beforehand on storyboards) director, the potential for coincidence becomes slim.

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